Storyline: Colony Reports, the first two days

11.18.2012, 08:17 PHX

The landing was successful, with only a few areas of damage. I have confirmed the return vehicle is operational, however significant fuel leaks will require repair, and re-composition of fuel reserves are necessary. The generation of fuel will require finding a significant source of water, which is underway.

It was a beautiful morning, but cold. I underestimated how cold it could be here. The landscape is beautiful and orange. I prefer to view it without the blue filters in my EVA suite enabled, although the brightness is a bit stark. I am surrounded by hills of painted rocks and soil, much richer than expected. I am sheltered in a large crater, that is beginning to fill in from erosion, but it creates a wonderful sunrise and sunset, particularly as the light shows through the dusty winds.

11.18.2012 12:00 PHX

Still adjusting to clock cycles. I have given up trying to keep up with earth time.

The lander module status is fine; however, I seem to be using water, food and air at a more rapid pace than predicted. This reduces the original estimate of 2 weeks down to something more like 10 days. The GPR device is functioning, however I am losing some of the results due to a glitch in GPS readings. This makes it extremely difficult to return to measurement sites as the wind quickly erodes the footprint left by the device.

I should note that I have found what appears to be icy formations about 80 centimeters below an area I have dubbed the Swamp. I have not been able to successfully analyze the crystals themselves as they evaporate in the pressure lock. I suspect these are not water, but a frozen gas. I am working to determine what possible gas formations can crystallize under the prevailing temperatures and pressures outside.

11.18.2012 20:17 PHX

Tired. Hungry. Again I underestimated the physical demands of this mission. The food is terribly bland and I am finding that spending more than a few cycles in EVA is wearing.

Found a likely sight for a water well. The oxide levels are high – so I am concerned about contamination. My estimates on current sustainability of existing resources will be further dialed back, meaning that I must bring my water levels up to 50% in about 8 days or face a prolonged stay. Our data on available water at this site, however, seem accurate. It seems that I have found a large water source about 180 meters from the lander. This is good news as lugging the drill and well head will be difficult.

While checking drill and well head status, was caught in a dust storm. The electrical and radiological activity was significant. Faced bright light but white out conditions. It took about 40 minutes to locate the lander visually as the EVA suit electronics were not functioning properly. Need to pay closer attention to pressure levels and the weather prediction systems.

11.19.2012 06:14 PHX

EVA suit is not recharging properly. I am forced to take apart the suit systems and clean all of the  connections. Significant powdery dust has accumulated in all of exposed connections and seems to be creating interference.

11.19.2012 08:47 PHX

Suit maintenance is completed. It seems that some of the materials oxidized the connections. I cleaned all of the terminals and the suite is fully charged. I must admit a bit of reluctance to climb back into the EVA suit and head out. I am still quite sore from yesterday.

11.19.2012 14:34 PHX

Success. The drill is currently pushing down to an estimated depth of 72 meters. I have found water. Tomorrow, will be setting up the well head, assuming I have hit an adequate pressure source.

The drill was a bit finicky. It seems the model provided is older than the more automated tool I trained on. Basic principles apply and I should have no issues retrieving the drill.

This was another terribly difficult day. There were three critical storms that slowed things down. In one case, I was forced to abandon the drill and return to the lander module. I am performing maintenance at every opportunity with the EVA suite. While this slows me down significantly, I am able to keep the suite at peak operating status throughout the day. Map module seems to be working again, but maintenance of all facilities are necessary and more frequently than protocol suggests.

Solar panels are covering up with the powdery dust. This dust seems to be a product of sand and soil that gets caught up in the plasma generated by storms. My analysis shows a variety of chemical traces all burned and sterilized in high temperature. After each storm, there seems to be an “ash fall” like event which is piling up on all horizontal surfaces. Also – the dust appears to be acidic, and has caused minor burns on my skin. All future maintenance of the suite will require gloves for cleaning.

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